Intro to Architecture Composition, Class 6 Recap

alexander calder flamingo
Week 6 of the Intro to Architecture Composition Class focused on contrasts. A relatively obvious location in the Loop is the Alexander Calder Flamingo in Federal Plaza. The bright orange of the sculpture contrasting with the surrounding black buildings is the most obvious contrast, which also offers a warm/cool contrast in tones.
If the emphasis is placed on the curves of the sculpture that creates another contrast with the hard grid of the neighboring buildings.
And, while not shown in my images here, sometimes the more historic, ornate architecture in the area reflects in the black Mies grid-like buildings, offering a contrast in the form of old/new.
alexander calder flamingo
The image below shows a contrast in what’s lit vs. what’s shaded. Which creates drama within the frame.
alexander calder flamingo
One of only two black and white images from the afternoon. The asymmetry of the sculpture in the foreground contrasts with the very structured grid of the Mies building in the background.
alexander calder flamingo
The next three are examples of the earlier mention of curves of the sculpture agains the straight lines of the building. Plus the play of light and shadow.
alexander calder flamingo
alexander calder flamingo
alexander calder flamingo
This is a very simple example of contrasts. First, of white and black/light and dark, but also the vertical white lines against the horizontal black lines running at a diagonal because of the angle of composition.

This was the last class that involved an assignment and shooting. The final week still included a critique of this assignment and some post-processing tips but for the majority of the class student’s printed a few of their favorites from the 7-week session. I’ll likely be teaching this class again next year, to stay in the loop, subscribe to my newsletter 🙂
 
Below is the student’s work:

Image by: Aura Mena

 
Image by: Evelina Snell

 
Image by: Tim Prosch

 
Image by: Lin Witte

 
Image by: Patrick Johnson

 
Image by: Yvonne Kamps

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