Using Shadows to Enhance Your Architectural Images

sfmoma, Mario Botta

One of my favorite architectural subjects is shadows. Of course, you need some source of light. The sun being the most obvious, but artificial light works too. Just keep your eyes open for unexpected opportunities. Let’s dive into a few ways to incorporate shadows into your architectural shots. Shadows as the main subject In these […]

Using Contrast to Improve Your Architectural Images

This week, let’s talk about a simple way to improve your architectural images: contrast. If you want more compositions and retouching tips, check out our Tips + Tricks post category. We regularly write about different ways to create stronger compositions, as well as post-processing techniques. Contrast can be as simple a dark vs bright. Using […]

The Guggenheim, one of the best architectural locations in New York City

One of our favorite locations in New York City, an in general, is the  Guggenheim Museum. Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, the museum is on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, right next to Central Park. While it’s not the most accessible location, it’s worth the trip, for both the art and the architecture. You’ll […]

Student Images from our 2020 Miami Workshop

Last week, we shared our own images from the Miami Workshop. This week, we wanted to showcase our students’ work, as they got some great shots during the workshop. After each workshop, we do a critique session online, and it’s always a treat to see what everyone shot. Caren Mlot It was Caren’s first workshop […]

Student Images from our 2019 Chicago Workshop

For the third year, we led a workshop in Chicago. This has become one of our favorite workshops and a city that is very popular with attendees. As always, we were impressed by our students and the images they got during the workshop. While the post-workshop critique is for students to get feedback about their […]

Student Images from our 2019 New York Workshop

After each workshop, we like to share some images from our students. We always love seeing what our students come up with during workshops, as they often bring different viewpoints on buildings we’ve photographed many times. This is why we enjoy the post-workshop critique session, during which we give feedback about our students’ images. Christine […]

Using Layers to Add Depth to your Architectural Images

We’ve been writing about compositional tools (like Negative Space, Triangles or Leading Lines) that can help you improve your architectural images. Today’s theme is layers! It’s a common element of photography, think foreground/background in landscape images. With architecture, you don’t always see what’s between the different layers, as oftentimes one building is hiding part of […]

Great Architecture in the Miami Design District

One of the highlights of our upcoming Miami workshop is definitely the Miami Design District. Located north of the city center, it’s an outdoor shopping center with luxury brands. What makes it unique is the care that was given to the design and architecture of most of the buildings and store in the district. It […]

Two Great Architectural Locations in Oklahoma City

Around the holidays, we took a road trip from Chicago to Phoenix. While it was mostly vacation and landscapes, we couldn’t resist checking out a few architectural locations on the way. One of the cities we stopped in was Oklahoma City and we found two locations with great modern architecture: the Scissortail Bridge and the […]

Using Negative Space in your Architectural Compositions

lake point tower

When photographing architecture, you’re often presented with two choices: fill the frame with your subject or leave some breathing space around it. The latter is called negative space and can be a great tool for your compositions. Filling the frame creates a busy composition, often resulting in dramatic, intense, sometimes overwhelming images. Leaving some negative […]